POETIC BLOOMINGS

POETIC BLOOMINGS, a site established in May 2011 and which reunites Marie Elena Good and Walter J Wojtanik to help nurture and inspire the poetic spirit.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION: CREATURES OF HABIT

Nuns

“Creatures of Habit”

WRITE A PIECE ABOUT SOMETHING YOU DO ON A DAILY BASIS.

TAKE THE MUNDANE AND MAKE IT AN EXTRAORDINARY EVENT!

INFORM POET – JAPANESE POETIC FORMS

We have explored many specific poetic forms and a good deal of them had their origins in the Japanese Culture.

Among our highlighted Japanese forms were:

 

Boketto

Bussokusekika

Choka

Dodoitsu

Haiku (Nature)

Imayo

Ryūka

Senryu (Not Nature)

Tanka

 

Choose one, or sample as many as you can muster and present some new twists to these classic Japanese poetic forms.

WALT’S FORAY INTO FORM:

 

BOKETTO

WHITE NOISE

The air is filled with static,
a bombardment of senses
meant to irritate; annoy.
There is no joy,
this moment must cease.

I must escape in my mind,
hoping to find inner peace.
No relief.

© Walter J Wojtanik

BUSSOKUSEKIKA

SUNLIGHT SONG

she sings like sunlight –
softly touching all it sees
her song – a blessing
meant to comfort all who hear
beauty is her melody
tender music is her soul

© Walter J. Wojtanik

CHOKA

THE MUSIC OF YOUR HEART

Hearts beat in rhythm,
a song of true love’s making,
never forsaking
the message it gives.
It lives to keep us dancing
for hearts are that way.

We chose how we step,
a waltz of passion’s fire.
What we desire
keeps moving our feet.
It’s the music of your heart
in this life’s slow dance.

© Walter J Wojtanik

DODOITSU

Where have all the flowers gone?
Trampled under foot; dying
slowly the fragrance lingers.
Beauty of blooms past.

© Walter J. Wojtanik

HAIKU

new morning descends

awakened from the long night

sunlit beginnings

© Walter J. Wojtanik

IMAYO

HER SONG

I hear the song that she sings – so sweet a sound heard
Each word bringing me such joy – in the morning mist
a melody soft, lilting – I will hum along
Strong emotion resides there – this song that she sings

© Walter J. Wojtanik

RYUKA (Variation 7,5,8,6)
in the clearing herons land
long flight has ended
rest has come to wings of passion
soon to resume journey
(7,5,8,6)
© Walter J. Wojtanik
SENRYU
Echoes repeating,
voices fleeting in the sky.
Flying verbal kites.
© Walter J. Wojtanik

TANKA

THE REACH OF LOVE

lost in the sunset,
golden arms reach to caress.
upon sand laced shores
two stand in time in this place
face to face, souls within reach!

© Walter J. Wojtanik

PROMPT# 264 – ITTY BITTY

We are not about to venture into writing “small” poems. (“There are no small poems, only small poets!”)

Today we play with the suffix ‘-ity’. Your piece will feature as your title and inspiration, a word that ends in ‘-ity”. A simple concept.

Tranquility, serenity, stupidity… you get the idea. Find an Itty-Bitty “-ity” word and expound in poetic parlance!

 

MARIE’S AUTHENTICITY:

authenticity

I witnessed unwitting wisdom today
when my five-year-old granddaughter said,
“I’ve never seen a lighthouse
in the desert.”

© Marie Elena Good, 2019

 

WALT’S COMPLEXITY:

SERENDIPITY, by Walter J Wojtanik

I never saw it coming.
It was no stroke of genius,
it was a random occurrence.
Serendipity laced with reality.
I have no doubt there’s a lesson
within it, I grin and bear it
and hope for the best.
The rest is up to what is destined
to happen. A possible happy dance
to life’s glad circumstance.
A fortunate accident awaits.
There is an upside deep inside.
Let it rise to the occasion.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION: A TOUCHING STORY

START YOUR POEM/STORY WITH:

 

“SHE TOUCHED THE LITTLE BOX IN HER POCKET AND SHE SMILED…”

BOX

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JULY P.E.O.D. CHAPBOOK CHALLENGE: PHASE TWO

We had completed the July P.E.O.D (Poem-Every-Other-Day) challenge two months ago. I hope you had a chance to refine and polish up your work. We had the opportunity to write to 16 prompts, giving us at least that many works to our credit.

For this phase of the challenge, choose 12 of your 16 poems and assemble them as it pleases you. Provide a title for your chapbook and a Table of Contents listing your completed poems. Send them in an e-mail to

poeticbloomings@yahoo.com

I will try to feature a collection at least one a month depending on how many responses. The more offerings, the more frequent.

I look forward to seeing how well we all did.

***

And seeing how Robert Lee Brewer will continue with the November PAD Chapbook Challenge at Poetic Asides, we will continue here as usual. The Sunday Seed, INFORM POET (or an exploration) on Wednesday, and FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION on Friday. Good luck with your endeavors.

PROMPT #263 – SEE THE TREE

 

We’ve all heard the saying, “You can’t see the forest for the trees.” That is telling someone that they are so focused on the details of a situation, that they are not seeing the bigger picture at all. But every picture begins with a simple brush stroke. A single frame. Regard the forest, but be mindful of the tree. See the tree.

So as we prepare for the onslaught of autumn in full brilliance, look at trees from any point of view you feel needs expressing. Follow the path of a leaf from green finery to the changes in color to the fall to the ground. Write of a barren tree and what it experiences. A stately evergreen tree. Palm trees even fit the bill. Think trees and write one as your mission.

MARIE’S  STILL FOREST:

A Holy Hush

Sleep came,
but the dreams that accompanied it
were disturbing
and all I could do was pray for peace
as worry for her threatened to devour me.
Disquiet was my life for months

and months

and months.

Then one night I found myself
walking a path of undisturbed snow.
The moon was my only light –
just enough to illumine the path,
glisten against the falling snowflakes,
and reveal the immense evergreen forest.
There was silence,
save the calming crunch
of snow beneath my feet.
I walked the breathtaking beauty all night,
accompanied by One who knows me intimately –

the only One who offers stillness
in the midst of turbulence.

© Marie Elena Good, 2019

“… and he said to the sea, ‘Peace, be still.’ And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm.”  ~ Mark 4:39

WALT’S EVERGREEN:

Image result for trees

EVERGREEN

 

I walk among the forest greenery
as it grows to enhance the scenery,
I love it as the time draws near,
for I can usually be found here,
with the fir trees as they sprout,
they make me want to jump and shout.
But, I reserve myself and smile,
and preserve the peace here for a while.
In this forest, there is silence,
free from any noise or violence,
And I attribute to these trees
for nothing gives me pause like these.
So, I will watch these beauties grow,
and get covered by the snow.
All contribute to the cause. Save the trees.
I am Santa Claus.

 

© Walter J Wojtanik – 2019

 

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION: P(L)AY IT FORWARD

PAYING

INSTEAD OF WRITING A PERSON’S REGRESSION IN A PAST LIFE,

WRITE THE PROGRESSION (FUTURE LIFE) OF THAT CHARACTER.

IT MIGHT BE A CHARACTER FROM LITERATURE OR MAYBE FROM SOME PRODUCTION.

WHERE WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE THE STORY GO.

PLAY IT FORWARD.

INFORM POET – PUN-KU

Today, we look back on a form created by a dear friend and mentor, Salvatore Buttaci. It had presented itself as a fun form and an addictive play with words. We honor Sal today by reviving his creation:

Here are the requirements for writing a Pun-ku.

(1) Unlike the haiku that allows for a less than strict adherence to the 17-syllable rule, the pun-ku must be exactly 17 syllables long.

(2) It contains only four (4) lines arranged syllabically as follows:

Line 1: 4 syllables
Line 2: 5 syllables
Line 3: 4 syllables
Line 4: 4 syllables

(3) As for the end-rhyme pattern, Lines 1 and 2 do not rhyme. Lines 3 and 4 do. Scheme: a-b-c-c

(4) The pun-ku must contain a pun on one or more of the words used in the poem. The subject matter deals with human nature, is light, humorous, or witty.

(5) The title of the pun-ku can only be one- or two-words long (or short).

WALT’S EXAMPLE:

DELOUSED

She’s had her fill.
She’s sent him packing.
And now the house
has been de-loused.

PROMPT #262 – WHERE’D THE CAR GO?

As long as we’re reminiscing, think back (for some of us, WAY back) to the first time you drove a car (not ride in a car as  a passenger, but actually behind the wheel). What are your memories of your first experience? What kind of car was it? Color? Make, model? Find something in that experience to inspire and write the poem. If you do not drive, write a mode of transportation poem.

 

 

MARIE’S DRIVE:

NO ROADMASTER, HERE

The first time I drove a car,
I didn’t get too far.
Just slow on the driveway
like Charlie’s big bro, Ray,
who in ’88 was a star.

© Marie Elena Good, 2019

 

WALT’S JOY RIDE:

EAT MY DUST(ER), by Walter J Wojtanik

I was all of nineteen,
in a clean seventy-two,
sky blue Plymouth Duster.
I had mustered together
what I could save,
(Dad gave me the rest).
It was the best car
I could have driven
at that time and as long
as I’m livin’ I miss
its punch. I had a hunch
I would. It drove like an ace,
put a smile on my face.
It surely thrilled me,
it nearly killed me.
But it was this boy’s
favorite toy. I wish
I had it still.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION: CURTAIN CALL

CURTAIN

YOUR POEM/STORY BEGINS WITH A CHARACTER PEEKING OUT FROM BEHIND A CLOSED CURTAIN. ACTION!

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