IN-FORM POET: Sedoka

The Sedoka is an unrhymed poem made up of two three-line katauta with the following syllable counts: 5/7/7, 5/7/7. A Sedoka, pair of katauta ( an unrhymed three-line poem the following syllable counts: 5/7/7) as a single poem, may address the same subject from differing perspectives.

Marie’s View:

PERSPECTIVE

NASA photographs
depict placid cotton swirls,
unsullied iridescence.

Cell phone photographs
catch unimaginable,
chaotic demolition.

Copyright © 2011 Marie Elena Good

Walt’s  Sedoka:

WILLOWY AND WARM

By life, inspired.
Her ways conspire to offer,
all that your words can handle.

Alluring and sure,
her style and grace are welcomed,
lifting you to heights unknown.

Copyright © 2011 Walt Wojtanik

BEAUTIFUL BLOOMS – PROMPT #9

As we return to terra firma, it has been a refreshing week of outta sight poetry here at POETIC BLOOMINGS. All of our amazing poets stretched their muses and imaginations and boldly went where few have gone before. In reading this week’s work, there was stellar work by our regular contributors, but the emergence of many new names and viewpoints has added greatly to our expressive excellence. Without further ado, here are Marie Elena’s and my Beautiful Blooms for Week #9.

In Marie Elena’s Orbit:

I have to wonder if there will ever be a week in which there is only one clear “pick” for me. Once again, I had a difficult time choosing only one … there were three out here that I could easily have highlighted. I finally decided on De Jackson’s “Celestial Notes to My Sometimes Self.”

This is classic De: A short piece dense with imagery, amusing phrasing, and excellent insight. Even if I read no further than the title, I’d be happy I didn’t miss out. Terrific work, as always, De. I read you.

CELESTIAL NOTES TO MY SOMETIMES SELF by De Jackson

It’s all clear
from up here.

So much doesn’t matter.
Feelings aren’t fact.
Spill your life out in ink, sweat, tears.
Just love. Especially yourself.

I’m writing it all in the stars.

Do you read me?

Walt’s telemetry:

We have all experienced the sensation of smallness; being a little minnow in the fishbowl of life. The beauty around us astounds us, and we feel inconsequential. The tendency is to just want to cut all ties and drift into the background.

This concept is beautifully described in this week’s piece by Jerry Walraven. Chev’s poem, “On Being Tethered in Space” is descriptive and imaginative, and gets my vote for a Beautiful Bloom…

ON BEING TETHERED IN SPACE by Jerry Walraven

The beauty of creation staggers me.

Unable to take in the enormity of space,
unable to touch down,
even on Mars (close enough to touch)
and taste Martian soil.

Or dance
with the Jovian moons.

This narrow focus
on human foibles
on one spec of cosmic dust.
There is no rising above.

So I close my eyes
and cut my tether.
Another piece
of human space junk.

****

As promised, the winner of the WOOD chapbook shall be revealed.

In many instances, the view from space always evokes comments about the smallness of the planets in the cosmos. Our own planet earth get referenced as a “blue marble”. In her poem, “I Concur”, Connie L. Peters mentions this blue marble and thus, wins the book. Connie, if you will e-mail me at poeticbloomings@yahoo.com with your information, I will send WOOD out to you as soon as possible. Thanks all for your enthusiastic participation!

DEEP SPACE NINE – PROMPT #9


Vantage point plays an important part in firing up our muse. The view from the ground varies greatly from the treetops. We see things slightly different. Today we are exercising our imaginations and playing with our perspective. So let’s blast off!

Your tether has broken away from the command module, and you are adrift in deep space. You are Major Tom floating by your “tin can”. But, you are not in danger. Until they can reel you back in, you have nothing but time to poem; equipped with your message board and an extraordinary view of the universe.

Write your poem, remembering your vantage point and your over-active imagination. “Can you hear me, Major Tom?”

Marie Elena’s blast:


Peering down on earth
From my perch upon the moon
I see no borders.

Walt’s attempt:

The poem I had written as this prompt’s example came extremely close to what Marie Elena had submitted.

From up in deep space

It is very clear,

I can see my house from here.

I am keeping my eyes peeled for a special phrase in the poems. The first to mention it will get a copy of my chapbook, WOOD. If it shows up as the title of the poem, I will include the CD featuring the reading of the book. Good Luck.

EYE OF THE BEHOLDER – PROMPT #5

Inspiration can be found wherever you look. Here is a case in point.

This provocative shot is one of many ground compositions Marie Elena’s daughter, Deanna Marie, has photographed.  None of Deanna’s photos are “staged.” She simply frames what she sees on the ground, and takes the photograph. 

What does this photo say to you?  What memory does it stir? What mood does it illicit? Is there music in its composition? Or, is there a thought it provokes?  Survey what the eye sees, and write where it carries you.

Marie Elena’s attempt:

HAIKU

apprehensively
she walks the path assigned her
softly detaching

Walt’s effort :

WHAT DO YOU SEE?

Decay in increments; comes alive.
When seen through a poet’s eyes
something lies beneath the surface.
Crusted flakes of paint appear
as the fragrant petals of rebirth
when written in metered verse.