JULY COVID-19 P.A.D. – DAY 9 DOING THE DOZENS

I’m not thinking about “The Dirty Dozen” (1967) or “Cheaper By the Dozen” (1950/2003). It’s back to the theater we go! Through the years there have been some great motion pictures that have graced the “silver screen”. And these films gave us some memorable quotes. I am offering up twelve (the dozen) of such quotations for your consideration. Choose one as an inspiration and write a poem. As always, I’m not asking for something related to the movie. Write something that is inspired by the quote and get ready for your close up!

“Why so serious?” ~ The Dark Knight (2008)

“I’m going to make him an offer he can’t refuse.” ~The Godfather (1972)

“Toto, I’ve got a feeling we’re not in Kansas any more.” ~ The Wizard of Oz (1939)

“Here’s looking at you, kid!” ~Casablanca (1942)

“Go ahead. Make my day!” ~Sudden Impact (1983)

“May the force be with you.” ~Star Wars (1977)

“Love means never having to say you’re sorry.” ~ Love Story (1970)

“They call me Mister Tibbs.” ~In the Heat of the Night (1967)

“After all, tomorrow is another day.” ~Gone With the Wind (1939)

“Houston, we have a problem!” ~Apollo 13

“I’ve always depended on the kindness of strangers.” ~A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

“Listen to them. Children of the night. What music they make.” ~Dracula (1931)

JULY P.E.O.D. MEMOIR CHAPBOOK CHALLENGE – JULY 19: FOLLOW THAT QUOTE

The Quote:

Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire. ~Gustav Mahler

How do you preserve the fire? What tradition (if any) do you hold dear?

**

Alternatively, find a quote that inspires you and write to that!

***

BURN THIS TRADITION, by Walter J Wojtanik

It is every parent’s honored mission
to hold close to this one tradition,
all for this annual condition
we call Christmas. It’s your decision,
but I give to you my permission
to call it yours too! Listen,
Christmas is one time of year,
where people fill with Christmas cheer,
it is the reason we come back here
to hearth and hearts we hold so dear.
And little ones perplexed with fear,
think, “were they really good this year?”
I’ve honored Christmas each December
as far back as I can remember,
traditions are a glowing ember
that catches on fire in shades of amber.
Filling lives in greater numbers
with so much love, a special caliber
of which you’ve never known.
For it is Christmas love that’s shown,
a love that truly is home grown.
It’s this “tradition” that we hone,
one we cannot leave alone.
I’ve seen it everywhere I’ve flown.
So while I’m flying for this cause,
from high up here I’m filled with awes,
despite our very human flaws
I’m happy I can take this pause
to celebrate with you because
tradition says I am Santa Claus.

PROMPT #251 – AND I QUOTE! #5

Today, consider this quote as the inspiration for your poem. 

Imagination is the true magic carpet.

~Norman Vincent Peale

It’s as simple as that.  Let your imagination run amok. Or write a “magic” poem. Maybe take a magic carpet ride, tell us where you’d go! There’s more than the obvious at work here. Where will you find your inspiration?

MARIE’S IMAGINATION:

WISTFULLY CONVINCED

I. JASMINE AND MARY

One flies on carpet.
The other, her umbrella.
Both take me with them.

II. UNCLE ALBERT

Sometimes I believe
if I laugh hard enough, I’ll
float to the ceiling.

III. DOROTHY

Don’t be surprised to
witness me clicking my heels
when I get homesick.

IV. BASTIAN

See, books are more real
than our realest lives, and “nothing”
can take that away.

© Marie Elena Good, 2019

 

WALT’S MAGIC:

THE PULL OF POETIC IMAGINING

A master of words and a need to create,
describes the man to a tee.
Any stretch of his imagination
becomes a march to places
that neither street car, nor train can take him.
It makes him change his thinking,
bringing all calls to share  his mind
an invitation to become faint of heart or die.

© Walter J. Wojtanik – 2019

 

PROMPT # 221 – “AND I QUOTE” INSTALLMENT #3

As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. ~John Fitzgerald Kennedy

We are all about words. Happy, sad, funny or absurd, every word is used with aplomb. 

But, JFK spoke of words by which to live. Is there a phrase or comment that you might consider words to live by? They do not need to be by anyone famous. Something a parent, teacher, a friend or even a stranger you overhear that had said something so profound that it made you think they could change your very life. We are looking for direction beyond the ends of our noses. Do you suppose you can write this thought? Maybe you will be the one to influence another. Give it your best effort, and we’ll try to live by it.

MARIE’S CHOICE:

“Bind my wandering heart to Thee.”
 (From Robert Robertson’s hymn Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing)

MY WANDERING HEART

Lord, I need Thee every instant;
Need to feel my hand in Yours.
When I feel my heart grow distant,
Call me back to heaven’s shores.

Lord, I long for angel voices
Harmonizing all day through,
Triggering my soul’s rejoicing!
Set my heart to praising You!

Lord, that I won’t wander far,
Faint in faith, and unfulfilled,
Lift my eyes to Christ Child’s Star
Where my heart is awed, and stilled.

Lord, I need Thee every hour.
Give ear to my earnest plea:
Hug me in Your staying power.
Bind my wandering heart to Thee.

© Marie Elena Good, 2018

 

WALT’S GUIDING THOUGHT:

YOU LIVE AND LEARN

I stand within the garden gate with hat in hand
as contrite as I can be, or so I’m told.
As I await my next (or last) command,
I hope it comes before I’m much too old.
For in this life we live, we’ll take a stand
and make our choices, be they brash or bold.
We live within the dictates of our hearts,
and reap the benefits that life imparts.

(C) Walter J. Wojtanik

PROMPT #215 – “AND I QUOTE” – INSTALLMENT #2

Here’s the quote:

“Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m Possible!”
~Audrey Hepburn

Image result for audrey hepburn

How is the impossible even possible? We wonder if we are capable to achieve great things because they seem daunting, haunting our every thought and action. “What’s the use?” we ask. We think we’re setting ourselves up for failure.

But, take this quote from Audrey Hepburn, star of the silver screen and a World Ambassador. From humble beginnings, she rose to her status in films such as “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” “A Nun’s Story,” and “My Fair Lady,” to name a few. Once retired from acting, she took on the challenge presented by third world countries, focusing on the starving and sick children. Always charming, always a loving soul. For Audrey Hepburn, she made the impossible, possible.

So, what’s possible for you? What do you consider out of your league? What have you or do think you can achieve?? Write a “possible” poem. Or an “impossible” poem. Or a hopeful dream … something you’d like to do but haven’t yet. Something “bucket list” worthy. Impossible? Positively possible!

MARIE’S “POSSIBLE”:

CURIOSITUNITIES

Castoff the conception that curiosity
killed the cat.
Inquisitiveness is
the origin of opportunity.
Actually, cultivated curiosity
converts to curiositunity,
and curiositunity
attracts astounding actuality.

© Marie Elena Good, 2018

 

WALT’S “POSSIBLE”:

NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE TO A WILLING HEART

I started writing at thirteen,
lyrics for a song I hacked out
on the old organ we had at home.

Melody first, a little loop
of sound full blown into a
song, my first attempt.

Looking at the words
scratched onto a page
of spiral notebook paper

tattered and lined
random thoughts
of a future love long gone.

It had form and meter,
it had rhyme, my reason,
a poem of sorts on my page.

A poem never to see 
the light of day for years,
dead ended in a rusted file cabinet,

along with every other lame attempt
of poem and prose that
had me believing I had talent.

Maybe talent, but nary a whiff
of confidence to show the
work that was even at this early

date, very personal, a glimpse
of my inner self, the now me
in miniature, immature,

but with a dream.
To see my words light up
the pages of this book of life.

The flesh was willing,
but the spirit was weak,
my ambition was a wishful thought.

I wanted to write in the worst way,
and that was what I did,
in the worst way.

As the years passed,
I still tried to convince myself
that I was a writer, a poet

a composer, an untapped
resource in a disconnected
reality, a dreamer

working for his hearts desire.
Hard work, hard words
mired in the muse of my mind.

But determined to live
according to the dictates
of my nightly mystic visions.

I dusted off my file cabinet,
shooing the dusty webs from the 
hidden treasures long buried.

I sent my words into the world
unsure of their worth,
afraid of their power.

Given to the eyes of
others of a write minded bent, 
sharing similar uncertainties

of their own. They labeled me,
tattooed me with an identity.
They called me poet.

The name I wanted;
the name they offered.
Nothing is impossible.

(C) Walter J Wojtanik – 2018

PROMPT #211 – “AND I QUOTE” – INSTALLMENT #1

The “AND I QUOTE” prompts will take a quotation from some random person of note and be the basis for our poetry. We’ve used this idea to some great effect in the past, so if it ain’t broke…

Today’s quote:

“If you wish to forget anything on the spot, make a note that this
thing is to be remembered.” ~Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe

You are asked to write about something you’ve forgotten. Write of something you wish you could forget. Or write a memory that has stayed with you for a long time that even “without a note,” you’ve remembered.

MARIE’S MEMORY (OR LACK THEREOF):

SCATTER BRAINED

It’s not so much in the forgetting,
nor even in the retrieving.
See, it’s in the connecting.
Though my brain is smallish,
that which is stored

here,

is far too often not perceiving
that which is stored

there.

The nerve!
Apparently my data is shy –
certified tongue-tied.
Unwilling to bond with
or respond to
the other facts and files
in my brain’s adjacent aisles.
They may as well be miles apart.

Oh the trials that stem
from data that scatters.
It matters.

© Marie Elena Good, 2018

 

WALTER’S WISTFULNESS WONDERING:

ON FORGETTING TO FORGET

My memory is dotted with crisp images
that have ingrained into the depth of my soul.
I have no control over them; they lay dormant,
only to bubble to the surface when I least expect.
Trying in vain to relinquish these old feelings,
I reel with remorse, this sad course I contemplate
leaves me silent and still and alone.
And so, I am left kneeling in supplication,
a broad brush of despair paints me.
Pagliacci’s clown cries out from within, making a spectacle
of my mirth and mired muse. My resolution
refuses to take hold; these memories dominate me.
It is too late. Love languishes.

© Walter J Wojtanik – 2018

AN ENTERTAINING SUMMER – DAY #26: SUMMER SIMILES AND METAPHORS

Another simple quote becomes our fuel for today’s prompt. The age old conundrum between the concepts of similes and metaphors. To refresh:

A simile is a figure of speech in which two unlike things are explicitly compared, as in “she is like a rose.”, “The thick fog is like pea soup.”**

In comparison, a metaphor is a figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something to which it is not literally applicable in order to suggest a resemblance, as in “A mighty fortress is our God.”, “The fog is thick pea soup.”.**
To throw a monkey wrench into it, a mixed metaphor is the use in the same expression of two or more metaphors that are incongruous or illogical when combined, as in “The president will put the ship of state on its feet.”.**
** All definitions are from Dictionary.com
The quote to trigger your response:
“Summer, like a kiss, trembles when it first arrives.” ~ Marty Rubin
Come up with a few summer metaphors or similies and put one (some) into your poem.

AN ENTERTAINING SUMMER – DAY #25: BUTTERFLIES

Here is a quote from John Keats. It is taken from ‘Bright Star: Love Letters and Poems of John Keats to Fanny Brawne:

 

I almost wish we were butterflies and liv’d but three summer days – three such days with you I could fill with more delight than fifty common years could ever contain.” ~ John Keats

 

Think of three “delights” you could present to someone on a summer day. Write them into your poem. Or even pen a butterfly poem! Or an ‘Ode to a Bright Star’.

You’re being given a free reign to write to this fine summer day!

AN ENTERTAINING SUMMER – DAY #17: QUOTING WRITERS AND POETS IN SUMMER

Another  few quotes to spark your poetic heart:

 

“I know I am but Summer to your heart, and not the full four seasons of the year” ~ Edna St. Vincent Millay

 

“Green was the silence, wet was the light, the month of June trembled like a butterfly.” ~ Pablo Neruda, 100 Love Sonnets

 

“Summer is only the unfulfilled promise of spring, a charlatan in place of the warm balmy nights I dream of in April. It’s a sad season of life without growth… It has no day.” ~ F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

Choose a quote and let your poetry grow beautifully from that inspired seed!

 

AN ENTERTAINING SUMMER – DAY #4: AND I QUOTE SUMMER

“What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness.”

 from “Travels With Charley: In Search of America” by John Steinbeck

On this day (Independence Day in the United States) we consider this quote. There are many comparisons implied or assumed in this line. Summer to winter, warmth and cold, good and bad, bitter and sweet. Write a two phase poem writing about two converse items and find a balance within. You might make your title the comparison: Hot and Cold, Light and Dark… But, be sure to mention summer somewhere in your poem! (We are celebrating summer after all!)