INFORM POETS – NARRATIVE

Narrative poetry is poetry that tells a story.

In its broadest sense, it includes epic poetry;

some would reserve the name narrative poetry for works on a smaller scale

and generally with more direct appeal to human interest than the epic.

 

An example of a narrative poem would be

The Raven

by Edgar Allan Poe

 

WALT’S NARRATIVE:

HE WAVED SOLEMNLY

She had come to leave his heart
they had been apart numerous times,
but as they ended, he sought solace in rhymes.
Words and verse of how she had come to depart.

She was a gentle soul, a vision for his eyes
soothing and healing, appealing to his senses –
he stood unprotected, without defenses,
anguished by the sound of her cries.

He felt tears welling as well,
for he could tell she would not be returning.
In his heart of sadness, he was yearning
for love to be enough, but it was instead a hell,

a fiery disposition, a fatal condition
that devoured her in ways neither expected.
Again rejected, a warrior with his love unprotected
a painfully unconditional contradiction.

To his fate he was resigned for she would be bereft him.
Life did things in its due time
as he realized that there was no solace in rhyme.
He waved solemnly as his fallen angel had left him.

© Walter J. Wojtanik – 2020

 

INFORM POET – QUATERN

A Quatern is a sixteen-line French form composed of four quatrains.

  • It is similar to the Kyrielle and the Retourne.
  • It has a refrain that revolves to a different place in each quatrain.
  • The first line of stanza one is the second line of stanza two, third line of stanza three, and fourth line of stanza four.
  • A quatern usually has eight syllables per line. It does not have to be iambic, or follow a specific rhyme scheme.

***

WALT’S EXAMPLES:

IN A POET’S HEART IS BEAUTY

In a poet’s heart is beauty,
it is through a sense of duty
that a true poet will express
what all poetic hearts possess.

This fact one cannot refute, see;
in a poet’s heart is beauty.
Romantic words to rend his soul,
the feelings wrought will not control

the depth of expression within.
To deny this muse is a sin.
In a poet’s heart is beauty.
Lightness of words, sad or moody,

bring delight to such expression.
They lift souls from their depression
never sounding harsh or haughty,
in a poet’s heart is beauty.

© Walter J Wojtanik

 

IN THE EVENING, WHEN DAY IS THROUGH

In the evening, when day is through,
the sun retreats to a place where
slumber awaits her brilliant hue.
Night is her time to seek repose.

And so, in her tired escape,
in the evening when day is through,
star-crossed lovers beneath the moon
hold each other ever so close

and share their dreams. It always seems
that it draws out a kiss or two
in the evening, when day is through.
Seductive sounds surround them so.

Yet sounds, like sunsets, seek repose
as morning approaches once more.
But to be sure, romance returns
in the evening, when day is through.

© Walter J Wojtanik – 2020

INFORM POETS – ENDECHA

The endecha is a 16th-century Spanish poetic form with the following guidelines:

  • Quatrain (or four-line) poem (or stanzas).
  • Rhyme scheme: abcb
  • Seven syllables per line for lines one, two, and three.
  • Line four has 11 syllables.

WALT’S SAMPLE:

THE FADE OF LOVE

In the dead of night she comes,
For years she had been unseen.
Soft as a whisper, she was,
and now she has escaped from within his dreams.

A gentle soul of lost love,
in search of an equal soul.
He claimed her heart for his own,
but it seemed that her fears had taken their toll.

Once afraid to give her love,
she searched so long for its touch.
the softest of caresses,
the sensation of passion needed so much.

She’s lived in his soul so long;
became a part of his heart.
loving her there from afar,
unconditionally from the very start.

Does she know the depth of love,
that reaches for her through time?
The one true sip of his heart?
The taste of love’s nectar so true, so sublime?

If their love had ever been,
they’d feel its pulse to this day.
But sadly, love not explored,
will languish for a time, and then fade away.

© Walter J Wojtanik – 2020

INFORM POET – RONDINE

The “rondine” is very similar to the rondeau.  

  • 12-line poem
  • 2 stanzas
  • 7 lines in the first stanza; 5 lines in the second
  • 8 or 10 syllables per line, except in the 7th and 12th lines
  • 7th and 12th lines are a refrain
  • The refrain comes from the opening word or phrase of the poem

WALT’S RONDINE:

I USE MY WORDS, by Walter J Wojtanik

I use my words to express my heart.
Words that live deep within me,
and I hope that you can clearly see
by the way my love songs always start.
So, with all the feelings I impart,
with all the thoughts there’ll ever be,
I use my words.

For love invades like Cupid’s dart,

quite sent straight to you, straight from me.
And as I proposed on bended knee
with feelings that came from deep in my heart,
I use my words.

INFORM POET – HARRISHAM RHYME

Harrisham Rhyme, created by the female poet, Harrisham Minhas, belonging to the State of Punjab in India.

It is a six-line rhyming stanza. 

In this form, the last letter of the first word of each line is the first letter of the first word of next line.

There is no restriction on the starting alphabet of the first line.

 

Rhyming scheme : ababab.

 

WALT’S EFFORT:

ENDINGS ARE BEGINNINGS

It is time to take a chance
To write a heart full of rhyme.
Over the moments, your poetic parlance,
Recharges you, time-after-time.
Surely and simply, words will dance.
You begin where you end, so sublime.

 

Copyright © 2020 Walter J Wojtanik

INFORM POET – HAIKU

This one’s for Marie! Seventeen, nice and clean.

To refresh:

HAIKU –

  • In Japanese the haiku is composed of 17 sound units divided into three parts – one with 5 syllables, one with 7 syllables and another with 5 syllables. Since sound units are much shorter than English syllables, it has been found that following the Japanese example results in a much longer poem. The Japanese write their haiku in one line. The Japanese, because of their longer history of reading haiku, understand that there are two parts to the poem.
  • In English, however, each part is given a line in order to clearly divide the parts of the haiku. This allows the reader time to form an image in the mind before the eyes go back to the left margin for more words. The line breaks also act as a type of punctuation. In English these are called the phrase and fragment. One line is the fragment and the other two lines combine grammatically to become the phrase. Without this combining the two lines together the haiku will sound “choppy” as the tone of voice drops at the end of each line.

Getting back to basics for a spell, and the Haiku fits right here. Join us for another short bit of wordplay!

WALT’S SEVENTEEN:

 

Crisply the wind sweeps

between the blossoms on high

through the breath of God

INFORM POET – RYŪKA

Today we’re presenting the RYŪKA.
The RYŪKA is an untitled poem usually consisting of four units
(often treated as separate stand alone lines when romanized or translated)
standardly with the following pattern of onji (sounds, syllables):
8-8-8-6, 
where as, the Japanese Tanka is 5-7-5-7-7. 
There are other variations of Ryūka such as
7-5-8-6 or
5-5-8-6 or
longer Ryūka with 8-8-8-8-8-8-8…-6.
Let’s write RYŪKA!
WALT’S EXAMPLE:
serenity lives
beneath the bright sun
lovers find strength in her warmth; light
caresses touch their hearts
(Variation – 5,5,8,6)

INFORM POET – LANTERNE

The Lanterne is a type of poem that has one syllable in the first line, two syllables in the second line, three syllables in the third line, four syllables in the fourth line, and one syllable in the fifth line that related to the first word of the poem.

Example

* 5 line poem
* each line has a specific number of syllables

line 1 = 1 syllable
line 2 = 2 syllables
line 3 = 3 syllables
line 4 = 4 syllables
line 5 = 1 syllable

* lines do not rhyme (BUT AS ALWAYS, THEY COULD IF YOU CAN PULL IT OFF)
* poem is based on one sentence or idea

 

WALT’S EXAMPLE:

eyes
windows
to the soul
hearts and minds in
sight

(c) Walter J Wojtanik

INFORM POET – DIZAIN

Last week, we glossed over a few French poetic forms. Today we explore the Dizain specifically.

A Dizain is ten lines rhymed;

usually (though not by definition) iambic pentameter.

This is originally a French form and initially would have been made up of eight syllable lines,

but later ten syllable lines were also used.

The few examples of this form in England did prefer Iambic Pentameter, but that’s purely up to the poet.

The rhyme scheme is: a-b-a-b-b-c-c-d-c-d.

 

WALT’S EXAMPLE DIZAIN:

SAN JOSE, by Walter J Wojtanik

“Do you know the way to San Jose?”
          “That is a good question that you ask!”
“I’ve been driving all night, but I’ve lost my way!”
          “It surely seems a daunting task.”
“Thank God, I brought a full hip flask

        “Maybe I could ride with you?”
“The company might be good, that’s true!”
          “I could talk while you would drive”
“And I’d stay awake the whole way through!”
          “A darn good way to stay alive!”

 

  • A variation on the Dizain called a Dialog Dizain.