POETIC BLOOMINGS

POETIC BLOOMINGS, a site established in May 2011 and which reunites Marie Elena Good and Walter J Wojtanik to help nurture and inspire the poetic spirit.

Archive for the category “Inform Poets”

INFORM POET – BREVETTE

The Brevette, consists of a subject (noun), verb, and object (noun), in this exact order. The verb should show an ongoing action. This is done by spacing out the letters in the verb. There are only three words in the poem, giving it the title Brevette.

Each of the three words may have any number of syllables, but it is desirable that the poem have balance in the choice of these words. Unlike haiku, there are no other rules to follow.

The Brevette was created by Emily Romano.

 

WALT’S BRIEF BREVETTES:

desire
e n f l a m e s
hearts

poetry
e n r i c h e s
souls

friendship
e n c o m p a s s e s
companions

 

INFORM POET – STACCATO

The Staccato, is a poetic form that consists of two or more 6-line stanzas.

Rhyme scheme: a,a,b,b,c,c

*Required internal rhyme scheme interplay between line #1 and line #2 (see below explanation and examples).

Meter: 10, 10, 8, 8, 10, 10

Repeats: This form requires a 2-syllable repeat in Lines #3 and #6 as specified below.

As in a musical notation, the Staccato poetry form uses short repeats which disrupt the poem’s continuity. The repeat words are read as rapid-fire speech, much like staccato music when played or sung. This lends itself to strong emotion or instruction, a declaration, an instruction or emphasis of human emotion, strong observation , or any similar situation where a strong staccato repeat is desired.

The emphatic two-syllable repeat in this poetry form is written twice, consecutively, at the beginning of Line #3 (each repeat in Line #3 is followed by an exclamation mark), and once again at the beginning of Line #6 (with or without an exclamation mark in Line #6). Please see below poem examples.

Also, Line #2 requires an internal rhyme scheme that rhymes with a word within Line #1, usually falling on the 6th syllable (see examples below), but can fall earlier in those two lines as long as the internal rhyme matches the syllabic stress in both lines

The below example poems color-highlight the internal rhyme schemes and the repeats as a quick reference aid.

***

WALT’S STACCATO ATTEMPT:

IN THE END

Poets write of love, singers give it song,

and bright creative souls cannot be wrong.

Feel love! Feel Love! Its tender touch

reaches so deep to mean so much.

And in the end, ones so loved are so blessed

but they are envied by all the rest.

 

Yet, love is not meant to be locked away.

You can bet words of love will have their say.

Give love; get love, equal measure,

and know it is life’s true treasure.

For in the end, others will share this prize,

It is perfection in the poet’s eyes.

 

© Walter J Wojtanik – 2019

**

If you haven’t yet, please check out Marie Elena’s interview with our “Candy”,  Candace Kubinec here:

https://poeticbloomings2.wordpress.com/2019/01/31/poet-interview-candace-kubinec

INFORM POET – SHADORMA

The Shadorma is a Spanish poetic form made up of a stanza of six lines (sestet) with no set rhyme scheme. It is a syllabic poem with a meter of 3/5/3/3/7/5. It can have many stanzas, as long as each follows the meter.

WALT’S SHADORMA:

IN LOVE THERE IS STRENGTH

He stood tall
beside one so true.
It was him.
It was you.
He carried your torch longer.
It made him stronger.

INFORM POET – DODOITSU

The Dodoitsu is a fixed folk song form of Japanese origin and is often about love or humor. It has 26 syllables made of four lines of 7, 7, 7, 5 syllables respectively. It is unrhymed and non-metrical.

WALT’S DODOITSU:

KILLING ME SOFTLY

The horizon looks more bleak,
for my search has finally ceased.
My love will die with your heart,
killing me softly.

THE POETIC BLOOMINGS READING ROOM – POEM #22

To stay on track, here is the poem for the Poetic Bloomings Reading Room #22. Another repeat for a repeat poet. At #82 comes Maya Angelou’s “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings”

I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS,   by Maya Angelou

A free bird leaps on the back
Of the wind and floats downstream
Till the current ends and dips his wing
In the orange suns rays
And dares to claim the sky.

But a BIRD that stalks down his narrow cage
Can seldom see through his bars of rage
His wings are clipped and his feet are tied
So he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings with a fearful trill
Of things unknown but longed for still
And his tune is heard on the distant hill for
The caged bird sings of freedom.

The free bird thinks of another breeze
And the trade winds soft through
The sighing trees
And the fat worms waiting on a dawn-bright
Lawn and he names the sky his own.

But a caged BIRD stands on the grave of dreams
His shadow shouts on a nightmare scream
His wings are clipped and his feet are tied
So he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings with
A fearful trill of things unknown
But longed for still and his
Tune is heard on the distant hill
For the caged bird sings of freedom.

INFORM POET – RIME COUÉE

It’s a single stanza that’s six lines long.

The syllable count is 8-8-8-6-8-6 or 8-8-6-8-8-6.

The rhyme scheme is usually a-a-a-b-a-b.

A scheme of: a-a-b-a-a-b is also acceptable.

 

WALT’S RIME COUÉE:

HOPE AND PEACE FOR THE NEW YEAR

We’re on the cusp of a new year,
and everyone is gathered here.
Good friends and the ones we hold dear
wishing each other peace
and hoping we’ll remain quite near.
These dream will never cease.

(C) Walter J Wojtanik – 2018

THE POETIC BLOOMINGS READING ROOM – POEM #21

I appear to be behind my time. I was making rather merry yesterday, celebrating the news of a granddaughter to arrive in mid-June. And that Christmas thing 😉 !

But, I’d be remiss if I didn’t offer a poem to our poetic devotees, and so I shall.

I’ve mentioned time. We are guided by it, sometimes a slave to it. But, it marks our place in this life from beginning to end. The group Chicago sang “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?” We all claim a clue, but do we? The Rolling Stones regaled us with “Time Is On My Side”, and Styx had “Too Much Time On My Hands”. So our poem today is by Henry van Dyke, entitled “Time Is”. It is a short rhyme, so take a short time and read it!

 

TIME IS, by Henry van Dyke

Time is 
Too Slow for those who Wait,
Too Swift for those who Fear,
Too Long for those who Grieve,
Too Short for those who Rejoice;
But for those who Love,
Time is not. 


INFORM POET – EPITHALAMIUM

Here is another theme-based form (er, I mean “genre” – Thanks Barbara) for you to try.  An Epithalamium is a poem usually written in honor of a bride and groom. But we’ll expand the thought in a way for this re-introduction of the Epithalamium. Write a poem to celebrate the marriage (joining together) of two somethings. Reese’s Cups are the combination of chocolate and peanut butter. Could be ham and eggs, comedy and tragedy, Lewis and Martin (for those of us that know better). Let’s toast the happy “couple.” Toast and jam? Another great combo!)

A (bonus) poem written for the union of our incredibly talented poets in the garden with each other and Marie and me:

A CHANCE TO DANCE

Will you, won’t you join this dance? .
Won’t you take this one last chance?
Would you, could you use your words,
write some poems (quite absurd)?
Will you take the steps you need?
Won’t you join us? Plant your seed?
Will you? Won’t you?

© Walter J. Wojtanik

 

WALT’S BLESSED ONION:

SUSTAINING MY MUSE

O’muse forgive me.
You were always there,
like light, like air.
When thoughts reveal
all that I feel, you provide
a voice for the words I choose.
Never failing, sending these
word kites sailing; soaring
into the atmosphere for all to hear.
I take you for granted here, o’muse
sometimes, and at times I abandon
my sensibilities when you give me
the ability to paint life onto a blank page
as if some sage had possessed me.
But, I owe all I am to what drives me.
A pursuit of poetic perfection,
a direction that joins us; a marriage.
Like melody and lyric, this empiric
connection is God-sent, meant
to express all that you suggest.
So muse, forgive me.
For all you share,
my light, my air.

**Inspired by “Farewell and Thanksgiving” by Mark van Doren 

© Walter J Wojtanik – 2018

INFORM POET – THAN-BAUK

In view of the Haiku’s popularity in the West, and the rising interest in Asian poetry, it’s surprising that the Than-Bauk is not more popular. Than-Bauk, conventionally a witty saying or epigram, is a three line “climbing rhyme” poem of Burmese origin. Each line has four syllables. The rhyme is on the fourth syllable of the first line, the third syllable of the second line, and the second syllable of the third line.

WALT’S EXAMPLE:

DREAMING NOT ALLOWED

Through the dark night
I just might sleep.
I fight to dream.

(C) Walter J Wojtanik – 2018

 

MARIE’S TRY

A LITTLE CHRISTMAS MAGIC

Man in red cap,
jolly chap, can
gift wrap “merry.”

(C) Marie Elena Good, 2018

INFORM POET – LANNET

The “Lannet” is a variant of the sonnet, as it consists of 14 lines. There is a strict syllable count of 10 per line. It has NO END-LINE RHYMING SCHEME. Only internal rhyme is allowed. There is no requirement of meter for a Lannet.

WALT’S LANNET LAMENT:

CHRISTMAS EVE AT NIGHT

I stand beneath the Northern Lights and smile
for in a while it’s time to go to work.
The elves and I refuse to shirk our chores.
Once I head out the doors of the stable 
I’m able to see Christmas Eve at night.
And what a sight it is! From way up high
in the sky, I try to make note of things.
It brings me great joy that each girl and boy
await my arrival. The cities seem
so serene at night, they twinkle so bright
like land-bound stars might, if they were land-bound.
I look all around at the world’s beauty,
and when I finish my duty, I take
a break – a pause, for I am Santa Claus.

(C) Walter J Wojtanik – 2018

& CAN IT BE A LANNET BY MARIE? 

A (P)LANNET WITH NO END RHYME  😦

Does Lannet rhyme with planet, or away?
Okay, please chime in any time now … hear?
‘Cause dear, my word buffet is spilling crud,
And bloody well could ruin my Lan-NEIGH.

(See, LAN-net would not work as well up there,
For its wrong stress would smirk at me for life,
And I’d be rife with strife forevermore!)
Oh LAN-net, don’t you see what you have done?

You’ve ruined all my Sonnet end-rhyme f … joy!
(Hooboy, I almost blew it on that line,
benign though that faux pas would surely be.)
A Sonnet-wannabe, is this Lan-NEIGH!

Its WAY confusing diction drives me nuts.
To write with these restrictions took some g … nerve!

© Marie Elena Good, 2018

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