POETIC BLOOMINGS

POETIC BLOOMINGS, a site established in May 2011 and which reunites Marie Elena Good and Walter J Wojtanik to help nurture and inspire the poetic spirit.

Archive for the month “September, 2019”

PROMPT #262 – WHERE’D THE CAR GO?

As long as we’re reminiscing, think back (for some of us, WAY back) to the first time you drove a car (not ride in a car as  a passenger, but actually behind the wheel). What are your memories of your first experience? What kind of car was it? Color? Make, model? Find something in that experience to inspire and write the poem. If you do not drive, write a mode of transportation poem.

 

 

MARIE’S DRIVE:

NO ROADMASTER, HERE

The first time I drove a car,
I didn’t get too far.
Just slow on the driveway
like Charlie’s big bro, Ray,
who in ’88 was a star.

© Marie Elena Good, 2019

 

WALT’S JOY RIDE:

EAT MY DUST(ER), by Walter J Wojtanik

I was all of nineteen,
in a clean seventy-two,
sky blue Plymouth Duster.
I had mustered together
what I could save,
(Dad gave me the rest).
It was the best car
I could have driven
at that time and as long
as I’m livin’ I miss
its punch. I had a hunch
I would. It drove like an ace,
put a smile on my face.
It surely thrilled me,
it nearly killed me.
But it was this boy’s
favorite toy. I wish
I had it still.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION: CURTAIN CALL

CURTAIN

YOUR POEM/STORY BEGINS WITH A CHARACTER PEEKING OUT FROM BEHIND A CLOSED CURTAIN. ACTION!

INFORM POET – CARPE DIEM

Carpe Diem is the Latin expression that means ‘seize the day.’ Carpe Diem poems have a theme of living for today. It is a form in intent only; it is solely based on a theme.

Write your poem celebrating the day. Or celebrate the arrival of autumn here in the northern hemisphere. Each day is a gift to celebrate.

WALT SEIZES WEDNESDAY:

TOMORROW NEVER KNOWS (Triolet)

We live with what this day will  give us
for that is all we’re assured.
So there’s no need to make a big  fuss
we live with what this day will give us.
There’s so much of life that’s a plus,
to look past today is all blurred.
We live with what this day will give us
for that is all we’re assured.

© Walter J. Wojtanik

PROMPT #261 – ALL THE COMFORT (FOODS) OF HOME

Think of a place where you feel the most comfortable and the good majority of us would say “home.” Either our current home or our childhood home, home answers most questions. And I suppose the one thing that gives incredible comfort at home is the food there. Grandmother’s Apple pie, Mom’s homemade soup, Dad’s barbecue all hold a special place. So write the comfort of home in the foods that satisfied and warmed you inside and out.

MARIE’S NOURISHMENT:

COMFORT FOODS

It’s Mom’s recipes –
stained, and written in her hand –
that nourish my heart.

© Marie Elena Good, 2019

WALT’S CRAVING:

SOUP’S ON

The patter of rain,
a steady downpour, more
monsoon than shower.
Hours spent huddled
warm under a soft throw.
Temperatures have fallen
the condensation thick
on windows as savory steam lifts
from soup kettle to nostril,
it fills you with reminders
of mom’s kitchen. You’re itching
to recapture her comfort.
Eyes beckon to doze through
the next few hours as the showers
do not relent. You are spent
and it’s mid-afternoon.
You can’t wait to fill your spoon! 

© Walter J Wojtanik – 2019

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION: CHARACTER SKETCH #1

BUTCHERTHE CHARACTER IS A BUTCHER.

GIVE HIM A BACK STORY – CONSIDER HIS HOME LIFE, HOBBIES, SUPERSTITIONS, APPEARANCE OR RELATIONSHIPS.

IN POEM OR SHORT FLASH FICTION, GIVE THIS BUTCHER SOME CHARACTER.

INFORM POET – IMAYO

The imayo is a 4-line Japanese poem that has 12 syllables in each line. If a 12-syllable line sounds unique for a Japanese poetic form, don’t fret. There is a planned caesura (or pause) between the first 7 syllables and the final 5. The 5/7 syllable splits are the familiar patterns found in other Japanese forms like haiku, tanka, and senryu.

The imayo was originally written to be sung, but that’s not a requirement. Also, poets have free range on subject matter.

WALT’S TRY AT IMAYO:

HER SONG, by Walter J Wojtanik

I hear the song that she sings – so sweet a sound heard
Each word bringing me such joy – in the morning mist
a melody soft, lilting – I will hum along
Strong emotion resides there – this song that she sings

 

Here’s the same poem as it breaks at the caesura:

 

HER SONG, by Walter J Wojtanik

I hear the song that she sings
so sweet a sound heard
Each word bringing me such joy
in the morning mist
a melody soft, lilting
I will hum along
Strong emotion resides there
this song that she sings

 

If you notice, this can offer three poems in one, aside from the variation shown above. The seven syllable lines before the caesura form a cohesive poem:

I hear the song that she sings

Each word bringing me such joy

a melody soft, lilting

Strong emotion resides there

and the five syllable lines after the break, the same:

so sweet a sound heard

in the morning mist

I will hum along

this song that she sings

Try a few Imayo poems and see how they feel to you!

PROMPT #260 – THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME

This year marks the eightieth (80th) Anniversary of the release of the film, “The Wizard of Oz” (1939). And for as much as it seems its been longer than that, the story does remain timeless and ageless. Being swept away to a strange land and encountering such interesting characters. The lesson reverts to home being the best place to be.

So, in celebration of such a milestone, adopt the persona of one of the many characters portrayed in the story. Write a poem of Dorothy’s arrival from that character’s point of view. Since the original story is basically from her perspective, Dorothy is off the table. But, it could be conveyed through one of the other main characters… it might be a munchkin or a flying monkey. One of the witches perhaps. Or Toto, too! L. Frank Baum had written more characters into his stories, but for our purposes, we’ll restrict it to the Judy Garland version of the film.

MARIE’S HAS A HEART:

Addressed by the Wicked Witch of the West

What?
You think you’re somehow
special?
You think yours is the first house
to ever be dropped here?

Well hear this, my pretty –
This city has swallowed dynasties
whole
and the only dear thing about you
is the pair of shoes you stole.
Return them now,

or refuse. You choose,

but at your own peril.
I’m feral, and there’ll be
no mistaking I’m taking what’s mine.

Oh, see?  My vultures are circling!
All in due time, my dears.  All in due time.

© Marie Elena Good, 2019

WALT’S NEEDS A BRAIN:

THEY CALL HER DOROTHY

All-in-all, she sure is tall.
We look up to her in a way,
that’s not to say we hold
her in esteem. But she makes our dreams
multi-colored. Glinda says
she came from afar,
from a long away Kansas star.
But, she sure is tall!
A few heads and shoulders
above the rest of us,
she could be one of the best of us.
She ditched the witch
with a house no less
and her little Toto too!
We had her in circles for a bit,
but the yellow path set her straight.
Come out, come out
wherever you are!
They call her Dorothy.
I love her shoes!
They’d go great with my green hair.

© Walter J Wojtanik – 2019

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION: OLD WIVES TALES

TAKE AN OLD WIVES TALE AND WRITE IT AS TRUTH. WRITE ABOUT SOMEONE BORN IN A CABBAGE PATCH, OR A PERSON WHOSE FACE STAYS DISTORTED AFTER MAKING IT, OR SOMEONE WHO NEEDS GLASSES AFTER… WELL, YOU KNOW – THEY SIT TOO CLOSE TO THE T.V.!

REMEMBERING SEPTEMBER 11, 2001 – NO INFORM POET

On an occasion when a prompt/form would fall on such an auspicious day, we never fail to pay homage and remember in our hearts and minds. Eighteen years have passed since the World Trade towers and Pentagon Building and a group of valiant souls suffered their fate. “9-11” – September 11, 2001 will always be remembered here at Poetic Bloomings. It was more than “some people did something”, it rocked our world and existence. Life as we had known it was altered forever.

Post a remembrance poem for 9-11. Whether it’s an old poem you had written then, or a new tribute written for this prompt, post it or as many as you’d wish. Never forget.

 

THEY GO ABOUT THEIR DAY, by Walter J Wojtanik

Don’t they remember?
They go about their day
as if nothing was wrong,
doing the same old song
and dance, as if perchance
it was all a dream.

But you cannot sleep
through such a fright.
It keeps me up at night
sometimes. Don’t they recall
at all how it happened?
They go about their day.

It’s not to say it’s an obsession,
but this confession is true.
What did you do when the twins fell?
Where were you when five sides
became four? When verdant pastures
claimed more? Don’t you remember?

It’s an indelible stain that remains,
a blotch upon all of humanity’s souls.
Yet, some go about their days, ignoring
and imploring we all do the same.
History forgotten is soon repeated,
and we will not be defeated.

It was no dream, this evil scheme,
it seems some would just as soon forget it.
And yet, it happened eighteen years ago today.
Without a thought, they go about their day.
What is there left to say? It happened.
Don’t you remember?

And poems posted at my blog “Through The Eyes of a Poet’s Heart”

MEMORIAM – Poems for September 11, 2001

Plus thirty photos you should never forget

PROMPT #259 – CHARACTER REFERENCE

We poets are an imaginative sort. And between reading, listening to music, watching television or going to the cinema, we have seen (shall I say met?) an assortment of characters to amuse and perplex us. Think of one such character from a book or poem, or a character from a show/film.  Write a poem either about that character, OR write from what you perceive to be their point of view. Any form, any style, put a smile on our faces.

MARIE’S CHARACTER:

PIGLET, ESPECIALLY

It was said that Rabbit is made
of important things.
Piglet said, “Rabbit has brain,”
and, “Yes, Rabbit is clever.”
And that may be.
Yes, that may be.
But our smidgen-y Piglet is made
of weighty things –
nearly all of him being empathy
and oh-such-friendness
and how-can-I-helpness.
As Eeyore said
on that blustery day,
“Mind you don’t get blown away,
little Piglet. You’d be missed.”
And when you are missed,
you are weighty, indeed.

Christopher Robin’s friends
show us how to be ourselves
among others.
Being ourselves among others is
an important thing.

A weighty thing.

A Piglet-and-Pooh-and-Rabbit-and-Roo,
and Kanga-and-Eeyore-and-Tigger-and-Owl,
and love-me-for-me-and-I’ll-love-you-for-you,
significant, super-salubrious thing.

And so, little girl with your Piglet in tow,
be yourself as you grow,
and let others be so.
And when you’ve outgrown
your sweet childhood ways,
please hold Piglet at heart
for the rest of your days.

© Marie Elena Good, 2019

WALT’S CHARACTER:

SEVENLING (THE HUNDRED ACRE WOOD)

The hundred acre wood has always grown,
a home for our imaginations to develop and nurture.
A pure place where we return in our age to the innocence of our youth.

Winnie the Pooh lives on, a comrade and fellow explorer
flanked by friends of flesh and fluff, full of love – we can’t get enough.
Generations have known his elation and joy, every girl and every boy.

And we are never too old to believe the good that emerged from the hundred acre wood.

(c) Walter J Wojtanik

Appears we went to the same place, Marie!  It’s a beautiful thing!

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