PROMPT #135 – THERE IS NO FRIGATE LIKE A BOOK

This line from Emily Dickinson may remind us that reading—which up to now has tended to mean books, magazines, newspapers, and the like, though that is changing—is fundamental to intellectual development and the refinement of language, if not to its origin. Most of us who write, whether it be poetry or any other genre, tend to read a great deal; the words, phrases, and ideas we use often are gleaned from other writers, not necessarily in toto but in spirit. This ‘traverse that the poorest may take,’ to paraphrase Dickinson, nonetheless can “take us lands away,” and, in so doing, open up ways of thinking and writing we had not dreamed of. That is the great gift of books. Write a poem about a book or books, or the act of reading.

MARIE ELENA’S ATTEMPT

HOLY BOOK (a sonnet)

A book of books; a letter to mankind
God-breathed to men of many walks of life –
And yet this faultless work is undermined.
Some say its very Author causes strife.
 
Translated into fourteen hundred tongues,
No other book approaches such renown
As this, which is as breath to failing lungs.
Throughout, God’s living hallowed voice resounds.
 
Amazing in enduring relevance
Astonishing consistency of thought
Unparalleled in unbound eminence –
Deny its holiness?  No, I cannot.
 
Though there are those who disregard His word,
My God will not be silenced, nor unheard.
 
© 2013,  Marie Elena Good
 
 

WILLIAM’S ATTEMPT

READERS

Of little things are readers made:
the word; the page; the well-turned phrase;
the sentences; the great parade
of little things. Are readers made
to merely see? The mind would fade
if that were so, but no, in plays
of little things are readers made:
the word; the page; the well-turned phrase.
 
© copyright 2013, William Preston

WALT’S PAST TIME

TURN THE PAGE

Words blend
sending imagination reeling,
feeling every emotion or notion
of adventure. No censure can
silence every act of violence
or love. Printed and bound
found on the shelf with other like
tomes. Curled up at home,
fire crackling, sipping on cocoa,
flipping each leaf of worded sage.
Turn the page.
 

© copyright 2013, Walter J Wojtanik