IN-FORM POET WITH RJ CLARKEN – MIRROR SESTET

Mirror Sestet picture

Because the Byron’s Sonnet brought up a little discussion of sestets and octaves, I thought it might be interesting – and challenging – to try another form of the six-line sestet.  The description and rules of the Mirror Sestet are shown below, but the explanation and further examples can be found at Shadow Poetry .

What is kind of cool is that this form can be rhymed, or not – whichever you prefer.  And, as no metrics were mentioned, you can use whatever sort of metrics that please you.

The Mirror Sestet, created by Shelley A. Cephas, is a poem that can be written in one or more stanzas of 6 lines each. The specific guidelines for this form are as follows:

The first word of line 1 rhymes with the last word of line 1.
The first word of line 2 is the last word of line 1
and the last word of line 2 is the 1st word of line 1.

The first word of line 3 rhymes with the last word of line 3.
The first word of line 4 is the last word of line 3
and the last word of line 4 is the 1st word of line 3.

The first word of line 5 rhymes with the last word of line 5.
The first word of line 6 is the last word of line 5
and the last word of line 6 is the 1st word of line 5.

The Mirror Sestet can also be written in non-rhyme.  All rules must be followed except there is no 1st and last word rhyming.

All right?  Write, all!

And on that note, here’s my mirror(ish) attempt:

Reflections

“You use a glass mirror to see your face; you use works of art to see your soul.” ~George Bernard Shaw

O glass which shows my face, you know…
…know that you’re my reflection. O
glass, o mirror, there’s impasse…
…impasse because you are just glass
and not a work of art, first hand…
…hand that paints a masterpiece, and

I long to see my soul.  My eye…
…eye is only human, so I
attempt beyond, but I’m exempt…
…exempt from that which I’d attempt.
Still, I can gaze.  It’s what I will…
…will I find me?  I’m searching still.

###

MARIE ELENA’S ATTEMPT

Online Dating Service

You got a call from God-knows-who
Who may be playing tricks on you.
He said he’d meet you here at three.
Three came and went without a he.
There may be cause for pause. Beware.
Beware! There are some creeps out there.

© copyright 2013, Marie Elena Good

(Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Albert_Roosenboom_Two_children_playing_dress_up.jpg; 19th Century)