POETIC BLOOMINGS

POETIC BLOOMINGS is a Phoenix Rising Poetry Guild site established in May 2011 to nurture and inspire the creative spirit.

IN-FORM POET – DECUAIN

The Decuain (pronounced deck•won), created by Shelley A. Cephas, is a short poem made up of 10 lines.  There are 10 syllables per line, and the poem is written in iambic pentameter.  It may be written on any subject.

You may choose among 3 rhyme schemes:

ababbcbcaa,

ababbcbcbb, or

ababbcbccc

For a longer Decuain poem, add more stanzas (to double, triple, quadruple, etc.).

MARIE ELENA’S DILUTED ATTEMPT:

BETWEEN YOU AND ME
(Yep.  More silliness.)

Lake Erie sits between us like a … lake.
Toledo’s shallow end is home to Jeep.

(One “shallow” quip from you, I’ll pound your … cake!
Remember, what you sow is what you’ll reap –
but I’ll admit your Erie end is deep).

You Buffalonians now brew LaBatt
But don’t expect to get it on the cheap.
(Unless you pop the bung and drain the vat).

I’d offer you a Mud Hens baseball hat,
But, as a Bison, you would NOT wear that.

You chastise me, my use of hat for cap?
And reprimand my use of vats for beer?
Okay, so please forgive my slight mishap,
But know that barrel don’t cost less, m’dear.

Excuse my blather – thoughts just won’t cohere.
Forgive my rhymes so obviously forced.
I didn’t mean to hurt your expert ear.
Perhaps my Decuain would be best outsourced.

Now, lose that smirk and wipe away that sneer,
Or buster, you can stick it in your ear!

😉

WALT’S DECUAIN:

CARPE

So long, Sandman! It’s time you take a hike.
The morning sun comes up above the trees,
and it’s already hotter than I like.
Yet, if it were still up to me, I’d squeeze
a bit more sleep into this morning, please?
But no, I must get ready for this day,
I’ll set my sail and head into the breeze.
There’s mouths to feed and bills I have to pay.
I’m thankful for these days I have to seize,
I’ll put up with a few more days like these!

The joys we share will fill our hearts with love.
there’s nothing like the feelings they will bring.
And in our long embrace our hearts will move,
to join together tightly as we cling.
We seize this day; to bow, give thanks and sing.
The evening fast approaches come what may,
and love becomes the most important thing.
So offer in the words you have to say,
compassion that will heal life’s undoing.
Take hold of life and feel your love growing.

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44 thoughts on “IN-FORM POET – DECUAIN

  1. Marjory M Thompson (MMT) on said:

    BERRY-GOOD
    We live where a great mass of berries grow
    And berries all must make it to the market
    Which takes the help of many folk you know,
    But every year the rain will try to stop it.

    Or else a big machine will throw a socket
    So hurriedly the socket must be fixed
    The farmer then is money out of pocket
    Which really makes the farmer very ticked.

    Then once all things are fixed back up to go
    The pickings done quite fast and never slow.

    • Great start, Marjory! Just watch your syllable count … 😉

      • Marjory M Thompson (MMT) on said:

        Thank You – Ya, you are right, I was slurring a bit 😦

      • Marjory M Thompson (MMT) on said:

        Marie – I do enjoy your fun poems and also your bantering!

        Walt – Also enjoy your poems and thank you for continuing to supply new poem forms for us to try.

    • Marjory M thompson on said:

      BERRY-GOOD (CORRECTED!)
      We live where a great mass of berries grow,
      Berries all must make it to the market
      Which takes the help of many folk you know,
      But each year the rain will try to stop it.

      Else a big machine will throw a socket,
      So hurriedly the socket must be fixed,
      Farmer then is money out of pocket,
      Which really makes the farmer very ticked.

      But, once all things are fixed back up to go
      The pickings done quite fast and never slow.

    • Marjory M Thompson (MMT) on said:

      OK, Marie – after I read your comments to Miss R about Iambic Pentameter (Thank you much for the comments) I see that there was more work to do on my BERRY-GOOD. I hope that I have it ‘closer’ to correct. Assuming the extra “da” from using …market, ….stop it, at the end of the lines are acceptable.

      BERRY-GOOD Iambic pentameter

      We live and play were many berries grow
      And berries must all make it too the market
      Which takes the help of many folk you know
      But, every year the rain will try to stop it

      Or else a truck will throw a needed socket
      Then quickly farmer gets that socket fixed
      Which means he shells some money out of pocket
      (and shelling really makes the farmer ticked)

      But once all things are fixed up right to go,
      The berry pickin’s quickly done not slow.
      o

      • Poetic Bloomings on said:

        Good morning Marjory!

        Unfortunately, this is still not true iambic pentameter. Iambic pentameter is a strict 10 syllables per line, in the daDUM pattern.

        The “meter” part of pentameter refers to the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables per line. The syllables are paired two or three at a time, depending on the stresses.
        Two syllables together, (or three, if applicable), is known as a “foot.” So in your poem, We live is one foot. “We” is unstressed and “live” is stressed (we LIVE). One unstressed/stressed foot is referred to as an “iamb.”

        Of course, the “penta” part of pentameter means 5. So each line of iambic pentameter has 5 sets of stressed and unstressed syllables (aka 5 “feet” = 10 syllables). 🙂 Back to the drawing board, eh? 😉

        Marie Elena

      • Marjory M thompson on said:

        BERRY-GOOD Iambic pentameter
        Thanks Marie,
        Thank you Marie, I’d say good afternoon, but I think it is Good Evening to you. (close to 4 pm here)

        .OK – Has to do (at least in part) with the MARK-it, STOP it, SOCK-it, POCK-it. I like those, but did wonder about them. 😦 I do want to get it right.
        What I am rerplacing is in the [ ], I am showing the STRESSED to help me see if I am “properly stressed out” 🙂
        MMT

        We LIVE and PLAY were MEANy BERries GROW
        And BERries MUST all MAKE it TOO the SHOW … [MARKet]
        Which TAKES the HELP of MANy FOLK you KNOW
        But, EVERy YEAR the RAIN will MAKE work SLOW … [TRY to STOP it]

        Or ELSE a TRUCK will THROW a NEEDed BLOCK … [SOCKet]
        Then QUICKly FARMer GETS that ..[SOCKet] BLOCK all FIXED
        Which MEANS he SHELLS some MONey OUT of SOCK ….[POCKet]
        (and SHELLing REALly MAKES the FARMer TICKED)

        But ONCE all THINGS are FIXED up RIGHT to GO
        The BERry PICKin’s QUICKly DONE not SLOW.
        o

  2. Why do you go out of your way to send your slings and arrows across this eerie pond to hurt me? I thought we were friends? 😉

  3. Damn my outrageous fortune!

  4. The Decuain: 10 lines; 10 syllables per line in iambic pentameter. May be written on any subject.

    “Goodbye, Mr. Chips”

    “You kissed me! You’ve got to marry me now!”
    Victorian words. Such a lovely phrase.
    I’d like to return to romantic days.
    To high-brow, subtle-toned, lady-like ways;
    not modern Madonna boudoir fore-plays!

    “You kissed me! You’ve got to marry me now!”
    Naivete? Perhaps. But humor hides
    in the subtleties of pink, primrose brides.
    Victorian ladies may have been sly
    when dropping their hanky for men to ply.

    • A rewrite. My apologies. I previously ignored the rhyme scheme!{b}{center}“Goodbye, Mr. Chips”

      “You kissed me! You’ve got to marry me now!”
      Victorian words. Such a lovely phrase.
      I’d like to return to romantic vows.
      To high-brow, subtle-toned, lady-like ways;
      no modern Madonna boudoir fore-plays!

      “You kissed me! You’ve got to marry me, love!”
      Naivete? Perhaps. But humor stays
      in the subtleties of gleaming white gloves.
      As tremulous ladies may have allowed,
      they dropped the glove in a mostly male crowd.{/b}{/center}

  5. Pingback: ~Perfectly Incomplete~ « Metaphors and Smiles

  6. ~Perfectly Incomplete~

    Beside smiling-still-pool, I wait for Thee,
    I look long into the depths pondering,
    strength in the reflections of moon and sea,
    power in them gravity-gathering.
    Pale power in me until conjuring;
    I need You to shine through me, to bring light.
    Pour love on my swollen soul, prospering,
    lest I live life less reflective and trite.
    Fill the shallow hollow places of me,
    please, grant me Your grace, this, my humbled plea.

    ©Hannah Gosselin 6/13/12

  7. Thank you for the form to learn…also for both of your poems to enjoy!

    Smiles to all poetical peeps today. 🙂

  8. Marjory M (MMT) on said:

    Hannah – that is neatly done both in form amd subject.

  9. Iam against Iamb, but here goes an attempt:

    The Axe (a Decuain for PB)

    I regret to inform you you’re fired.
    As you must know the firm is cutting down.
    Times have changed quite a bit since your hire.
    We sincerely hope a new job is found
    for you. I don’t want you back in the pound.
    Not every dachshund can learn his commands;
    in the field of commercials you astound.
    Alas, our sponsor has only two hands
    to deal with mixed breeds who do not aspire
    to riches by jumping through hoops of fire.

  10. “Charade preacher”

    He gives in shallow grace or not at all
    when faced with duty or desire for love.
    A dry valley where autumn drifters crawl
    for fragments of a song proved not enough
    to fill each lonely heart with promise of
    a life divine. He steals his wanton needs
    from crumbs left deep inside by blackened gloves
    of cycled lies that scorn and sow false seeds.
    A cup of hiss he grants, one winked eye pleads
    for sheep to follow wherever he leads.

  11. Carpe Diem

    Whatever little tree you fail to see
    might be the very billion out of one
    that make you change direction for the sea
    to grasp the blue water under the sun
    and to grasp the tragedy and the fun
    that kept you going despite your losses.
    You might wonder of things you could have done,
    might throw a stone to see how it tosses,
    might say Ydrasil and think of a tree
    might say that here is where you want to be.

  12. Sorry, of course “makes you” – oh, I always have to remember that “s.” In my first language the verb doesn’t change in tenses.

  13. Driving Home

    I’m glad to have them home, oh yes its true.
    Although I see them less than I would like.
    The schedule that they keep can make me blue.
    At least they like the car and not the bike
    to get them to their schedules up the pike.
    It gives me time to chat and hear the scoop
    on all the friends both boys and girls alike.
    Chauffeuring them, it keeps me in the loop,
    but soon a teen will have her license too,
    I hope to Mom they do not say adieu!

    © KED 2012

    • Marjory M Thompson (MMT) on said:

      Very real tale. Yes, it is nice to be in the loop. Hope a little bit of the curve is always there for you.

  14. When You Come Creeping

    When you come creeping to my sleeping mind
    Nothing’s ever no never as it seems
    So don’t come thinking you know what you’ll find
    Chances are great you’ll be lost in my dreams
    Wound round backwards as if snarled in my schemes
    Try not to panic; that’d be a mistake
    Streets of escape will turn into slick streams
    Ready to drown you as deep as any lake
    And even dreaming your death, won’t feel fake
    You’ll struggle and gasp but still will not awake

  15. Marjory M thompson on said:

    Interesting ‘dream scheme’
    The form is a challenge!
    Good go.

    [Maybe change ‘..any lake’ to ‘…a lake, ?]

  16. This form is terribly difficult . . . perhaps that’s why I’ve taken a week to attempt it. I’m pretty sure my iambic pentameter is far from consistent, and the whole poem’s a bit stilted, but at least it’s done, eh? 🙂

    Drowning Out

    We wish for rain to go away, and stay
    As far as it can go. We wish so hard
    To see the sun remain for a whole day.
    Alas, the sun remains cloudily marred.
    A song shrivels on the lips of the bard,
    Whose notes die shiv’ring without sunshine’s heat.
    The clouds stand silently, coldly on guard,
    Moving only to thunder’s angry beat.
    Though the songs of June should have come our way,
    We hear only the rain of chilly May.

    • Poetic Bloomings on said:

      Hi Miss R!

      Iambic pentameter keeps this beat: daDUM daDUM daDUM daDUM daDUM. Your poem is just delightful – and can be made perfect relatively easily. You’ve held perfectly to the 10 syllables – you just need to watch where the accents fall in your words. Your first line is perfect, and reads very naturally:

      “We WISH for RAIN to GO aWAY, and STAY” = daDUM daDUM daDUM daDUM daDUM . Perfect!

      And your next line is perfect as well:
      “As FAR as IT can GO. We WISH so HARD” = daDUM daDUM daDUM daDUM daDUM . Perfect again!

      Your third line needs some tweaking:
      “To SEE the SUN reMAIN for A whole DAY” See how the established iambic pentameter messes up the natural speech pattern? We would not naturally place the accent on “A.” We would more naturally say, “To SEE the SUN reMAIN for a whole DAY.”
      To fix that, you just need to figure out an alternative way to word it. Perhaps:
      “To SEE the SUN reMAIN with US toDay.” See how it fits the beat, but sounds more natural? This can be done with all the lines that don’t really hold to natural speech patterns. Here’s a sample of what can be done to fix the cadence without totally ruining the beautiful feel of your poem.

      Drowning Out

      We wish for rain to go away, and stay
      As far as it can go. We wish so hard
      To see the sun remain with us today.
      Yet, cloud-filled skies invade – the sun is marred.
      A shriveled song lies cloaked inside the bard,
      Whose notes die shiv’ring, lacking sunshine’s heat.
      The clouds stand silently, stiffly on guard,
      And solely move to thunder’s angry beat.
      Though songs of June should now have come our way,
      We only hear the rain of chilly May.

      Truly, you’ve written a lovely poem, with such beautiful phrasing! Simply be mindful of how the required beat works either for or against natural placement of accents on your words, and you’re all set!

      And btw, “That Miss R” is the cutest pen name!

      Marie Elena

  17. Pingback: “Drowning Out” « A Particle of Difference

  18. Gently in Her Hand
    A Decuain

    She whispered to the wind that blew thru trees.
    She hoped that rain would splatter from the sky.
    She wished for something more and she said please.
    She knew down deep inside that she must try.
    She asked herself what happened, also why.
    She held the whole world gently in her hand.
    She’d drown in all if she let out a cry.
    She couldn’t let it go nor take a stand.
    She gazed upward and knelt upon her knees.
    She closed her eyes and prayed for a strong breeze.

    By Michael Grove

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